About your Search

20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
department says sandy had only a minimal effect. is it true a clean number and what are conspiracy theorists saying. >>> a comment hastings made last july. what does it say about s.e.c. rules and whether they are out of date. >> mcdonald's will post same store sales on monday gets an upgrade to buy taking the forecast to a street high after surveying franchisees. we begin with november jobs number. 146,000 nonfarm jobs added last month above forecast of 80,000. october and september payrolls were revised lower. unemployment rate fell by 0.2 to 7.7. that's the lowest in four years. the dip occurring mostly because more people stopped looking for work and were not counted as unemployed. as for hurricane sandy, the labor department says the storm did not substantively impact the november results and that probably was the biggest surprise to everybody. >> this is a very strong number. i think only u.s. government now can stop this kind of job growth. a fiscal cliff go over -- >> snatching victory from the jaws. >> a superstorm. nothing can stop the generation of jobs in this economy. >> there's
say the slow down in nonfarm payrolls will reflect the effect of sandy. joining us this hour is bank of america merrill lynch global research senior research economist michelle mire and we'll talk through everything that's been happening through jobs and what to expect. but first, there is a developing story. an earthquake off the northeast coast of japan triggered a tsunami warning. the warning has been lifted, but it was a 7.3 quake. so far no reports of any injuries or damage. it was for the same area devastated by an earthquake and tsunami back in march of last year. we will continue to bring you any developments. in the meantime, steve has some of the morning's top other stories. >> let's start with the markets. asian stocks rallying to 2012 highs overnight. the nikkei edging lower after hitting a se hitting hitting a seven month closing high yesterday. european trading, shares seem to be fwllat. bundesbank announced it had cut its growth outlook for the country. in the u.s., the nasdaq snapped its losing streak yesterday with its first gain in five days. the dow was on pace for
be 8%. and all this despite the effects of hurricane sandy. who knows how high we could have been if it weren't for that darn hurricane? yet the market barely blinked. yet the potential layoffs if we go over the cliff make these rearview numbers seem almost irrelevant to the market. hence the mixed performance of the averages today. sure, dow gained 81 points, but the s&p barely budged, edging up 29%. and the nasdaq actually declined .38%, led once again by the slip sliding away apple, which you know i like, but how many times during a particular show can i say i like it? so with that in mind, what's the game plan for next week? first off, perhaps the most important day of the week is monday. but not for any earnings. not for any releases. that's when we process the results of the weekend talk shows, which you now have to watch as if we were instead of watching, you know, college gameday, i'm watching like some of those other news stations -- and then of course sunday morning whoever -- you don't even pay attention -- football means nothing now, right? it's all this. last week we
superstorm sandy. find out at 8:30 a.m. eastern. and cut! very good. o geico's customer satisfaction is quite real though. this computer-animated coffee tastes dreadful. geico. 15 minutes could save you 15 % or more on car insurance. someone get me a latte will ya, please? >>> welcome back to "squawk box" everyone. the futures right now are at this point right around the flat line. we had seen the dow futures up by 15 points or so, it's come back down but probably a lot of people waiting to see what happens in washington because it's been driving trading for several weeks. >>> honda is expecting within two years it will export more vehicles than it imports from japan. the company says the factories will take on a larger role in global product development at that point. >>> all right, i've been wanting to ask larry some specific questions and i'm going to do it now because actually some of the stuff you talk about doug oberhelm, you teach economics, you're an economic sage so the mantra and we heard it again that if we could get rid of the, which is hard, but is the obama's administration resi
liquidators to find out if increased home sales and efforts to rebuild after hurricane sandy could drive it higher. all coming up on "mad money." >>> don't miss a second of "mad money." follow @jimcramer on twitter. have a question? tweet cramer. #madtweets. send jim an e-mail to madmoney@cnbc.com. or give us a call at 1-800-743-cnbc. miss something? head to madmoney.cnbc.com. [ male announcer ] what can you experience in a seat? inspiration. great power. iconic design. exhilarating performance. [ race announcer ] audi once again has created le mans history! [ male announcer ] and once in a great while... all of the above. take your seat in the incomparable audi a8. take advantage of exceptional values on the audi a8 during the season of audi event. >>> here in the united states, we're sitting on titanic amounts of energy that's both cheaper and cleaner than coal or oil, talking about natural gas. but we end up burning off millions of cubic feet of it a day because we don't have enough demand since our government refuses to support embracing nat gas for service vehicles. while we probabl
here, sandy was terrible. that will subtract from growth. we also have the little twinkie strike which is something that everybody's worried about, so that will subtract. so when you net all those things out, you'll probably get a number closer to 90,000. but when you net those things out, you know in future months you'll get more growth. 2 pch 2.7, a lot was inventory based. so economic growth probably gets weaker. but as the rebuilding takes prar place, the strike resolved, no jobs no doubt. >> so in the meantime we go back above 8%? >> i think there's a chance that you can touch 8%, but i think you'll stay somewhere near the 8% range. >> if you had to make a prediction like i did, i had to make a prediction for where unemployment would be a year from now. i said somewhere in the 7s. >> i think by the end of next year you'll get a near somewhere in the neighborhood of 7.4, 7.5. still in the 7s. because again, we are going to glow next year something close to 2% and probably a little bit below that. that's not consistent with a huge deceleration of the unemployment rate. >> unless the
/2 minute's time. jobless claims coming in, down and this number should be essentially clean of sandy effects, so finally a clean read as to the claims aspect. but it doesn't look like, jim, that we are set for a lower open today. >> carl pointed out that maybe there's some room between sides. but, look, yesterday was one of those days, show a lot of americans don't even know about the fiscal cliff. paychecks are going to go down, a million layoffs in the defense industry. no one seems to care right now. it's bad. >> you know what we have going for us? the grid, december 17 announced -- on a seasonal basis, they have reiterated once again that it doesn't have the demand to be sold year round, but starting a week from monday. >> i don't buy that. i think they do it because whenever they have mcrib, they're just fighting traffic for mcrib. there are places in the world where the mcrib is on the menu all the time. in case you're there on your vacation. >> i'm learning here all the time. i'm always learning. >> switch from the bacon cheese-inator. [ bell rings ] . >> celebrating the groun
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)